All Books Sale Books Course Books Events & News Stores Sale Books Sale Books Course Books Course Books Course Books Events & News Events & News Events & News Stores
twitter
All Books
on our tables
new releases
best sellers
Browse the Labyrinth...
African American Studies
African Studies
Anthropology & Archaeology
Architecture
Art
Asian Studies
Biography
Children's Books
Christianity
Classical Studies
Cognitive Sciences
Cultural Studies
Current Events
Design & Fashion
Eastern European Studies
Eastern Religion & Philosophy
Economics
Education
Environmental Studies
European History & Politics
Film & Media
Food & Cooking
Foreign Language
Gay & Lesbian Studies
General History & Historiography
Home, Garden & Crafts
Islamic Studies
Jewish Studies
Labor Studies
Latin Am. & Caribbean Studies
Law & Legal Studies
Linguistics & Languages
Literary Theory & Criticism
Literature
Marxist Studies
Medical & Health Studies
Middle Eastern Studies
Music & Dance
Mythology
Native American Studies
Natural History & Nature
No export
Philosophy
Photography
Political Philosophy
Political Science
Psychoanalysis
Psychology
Reference
Religion
S. Asian Studies & Oceania
Sciences
Sociology
Stationery
Technology, Computers & Engineering
Trade Fiction
Trade Non-fiction
Travel
U.S. History & Politics
Urban Studies & Geography
Women's Studies
Title Details
Against the Grain by Scott, James C.
Against the Grain: A Deep History of the First Civilizations
by Scott, James C.
 
An account of all the new and surprising evidence now available for the beginnings of the earliest civilizations that contradict the standard narrative

Why did humans abandon hunting and gathering for sedentary communities dependent on livestock and cereal grains, and governed by precursors of today’s states? Most people believe that plant and animal domestication allowed humans, finally, to settle down and form agricultural villages, towns, and states, which made possible civilization, law, public order, and a presumably secure way of living. But archaeological and historical evidence challenges this narrative. The first agrarian states, says James C. Scott, were born of accumulations of domestications: first fire, then plants, livestock, subjects of the state, captives, and finally women in the patriarchal family—all of which can be viewed as a way of gaining control over reproduction.

Scott explores why we avoided sedentism and plow agriculture, the advantages of mobile subsistence, the unforeseeable disease epidemics arising from crowding plants, animals, and grain, and why all early states are based on millets and cereal grains and unfree labor. He also discusses the “barbarians” who long evaded state control, as a way of understanding continuing tension between states and nonsubject peoples.
 
Published August, 2017 by Yale University Press, Hardcover, 336 Pages, ISBN: 9780300182910, ISBN-10: 0300182910, List Price $26.00.

Buy New - $26.00
 Add to Wish List

Other books by Scott, James C.
Other books in General History & Historiography
Other books in Classical Studies
 
 
Inventory Snapshot
Princeton --> New for $26.00
All Books Sale Books Course Books Events & News Stores All Books Sale Books Course Books All Books All Books Course Books Course Books help policies contact
All Books on our tables new releases
best sellers